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Global Warming News -- ScienceDaily
Global Warming Research. Learn about the causes and effects of global warming. Consider possible global warming solutions. Read predictions of rising sea levels, coral reef bleaching and mass extinctions climate change may cause.

Global Warming News -- ScienceDaily
  • Hiatus in global average temperatures has little effect on projected temperatures in 2100
    The recent slowdown in the rise of global average air temperatures will make no difference to how much the planet will warm by 2100, a new study has found.

  • Thawing permafrost feeds climate change
    Single-cell organisms called microbes are rapidly devouring the ancient carbon being released from thawing permafrost soil and ultimately releasing it back into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, according to new research. Increased carbon dioxide levels, of course, cause the Earth to warm and accelerate thawing.

  • Entire genomes of woolly mammoths mapped: Clues to extinction, possibility of bringing mammoths back
    An international team of researchers has sequenced the nearly complete genome of two Siberian woolly mammoths -- revealing the most complete picture to date -- including new information about the species' evolutionary history and the conditions that led to its mass extinction at the end of the Ice Age.

  • High mountains warming faster than expected
    High elevation environments around the world may be warming much faster than previously thought, according to members of an international research team. They call for more aggressive monitoring of temperature changes in mountain regions and more attention to the potential consequences of warming.

  • Arctic beetles may be ideal marker of climate change
    Researchers need to find ways to measure how the changes in climate are affecting biodiversity. One of the best places to look may be down at our feet, at beetles. That`s because, as a research team discovered after doing the first large-scale survey of Arctic beetles, these six-legged critters are not only abundant in number but also diverse in feeding habits and what they eat is closely linked to the latitude in which they are found.

  • Are gas hydrates a source of environmentally friendly energy?
    Gas hydrate is also known as the ice that burns. And all that burns releases energy. And a lot of energy is stored in hydrates and there are gigatons of it stored in the sediments of the oceans. 

  • Global warming more moderate than worst-case models, empirical data suggest
    A study based on 1,000 years of temperature records suggests global warming is not progressing as fast as it would under the most severe emissions scenarios outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Natural decade-to-decade variability in surface temperatures can account for some much-discussed recent changes in the rate of warming. Empirical data, rather than climate models, were used to estimate this variability.

  • Amazon rainforest losses impact on climate change, study shows
    Human activity has removed more than one-tenth of trees and plants from the Amazon rainforest since the 1960s, a study shows. Widespread removal of trees has contributed to a rise in the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, increasing the potential impact of climate change, researchers say.

  • Phytoplankton, reducing greenhouse gases or amplifying Arctic warming?
    Scientists have presented the geophysical impact of phytoplankton that triggers positive feedback in the Arctic warming when the warming-induced melting of sea ice stimulates phytoplankton growth.

  • Extending climate predictability beyond El Niņo
    Tropical Pacific climate variations and their global weather impacts may be predicted much further in advance than previously thought, according to research by an international team of climate scientists. The source of this predictability lies in the tight interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere and among the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian Oceans. Such long-term tropical climate forecasts are useful to the public and policy makers, researchers say.

  • Soil nutrients may limit ability of plants to slow climate change
    Many scientists assume that the growing level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will accelerate plant growth. However, a new study suggests much of this growth will be curtailed by limited soil nutrients.

  • As US assumes Arctic Council chairmanship, new report emphasizes cooperation over conflict
    Although the media often portray the Arctic as a new 'Great Game' ripe for conflict, a group of international Arctic experts has released recommendations aimed at preserving the polar north as an area for political and military cooperation, sustainable development and scientific research.

  • Strong currents promote release of Arctic greenhouse gas
    Ocean and Earth Science researchers reveal how the interplay between ocean currents and marine microbiology serve to regulate potentially damaging emissions of the potent greenhouse gas methane, created beneath the Arctic Ocean.

  • Hurdles to US climate change action are in economics and politics, not divided science
    Policymakers argue over the consensus on global warming and climate change, but science is not to blame, experts say. In a new paper, scientists suggest looking at business interests, partisan predispositions and political ideology for the hurdles to policy action. "Different perceptions and claims among lawmakers are a major hurdle to agreeing on action to address global warming and these were thought to simply reflect scientific uncertainty," says the study's lead author. "However, our findings show that congressional testimonies are in fact consistent with agreement in the climate science community and that the sources of controversies must lie elsewhere."

  • Greenland continuing to darken
    Darkening of the Greenland Ice Sheet is projected to continue as a consequence of continued climate warming, according to experts.


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